Wednesday, November 26, 2014

SOULLESS WASTELAND OFCORPORATE IRELAND




“Tír gan teanga, tír gan anam. A country without a language is a country without a soul.”
Pádraig Pearse

James Joyce like Samuel Beckett fled to Paris and famously said: 'Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages', that "No self-respecting person wants to stay in Ireland. Instead he will run from it, as if from a country that has been subjected to a visitation by an angry Jove." 


"Your music should be abou' where you're from an' the sort o' people yeh come from.—Say it once, say it loud, I'm black an' I'm proud ...—The Irish are the niggers of Europe, lads." —Roddy Doyle, The Commitments. There are also claims that Malcolm X said, "The Irish are the blacks of Europe !" but he was talking about the Irish genetic connection to the Moors, by way of Spain. However the analogy is valid. The last large numbers of white people to be sold into slavery, were the Irish with 150,000 sold back in the 1600s, when English pirates sold Irish slaves, regarding them as another species.

Events around the global banking crisis of 2008 and more particularly how it was mishandled in Ireland, have again clarified that the Irish working class are being treated like the blacks of Europe. Currently Ireland is fourth globally in suicide rates for males age 18-24, according to a 2014 report with unemployment rates comparable to black ghettos in the States. With the fall-out from the Irish bail out the banking bondholders, resulting austerity and recession, bringing the Irish economy and living conditions below dozens of 'third world countries, it is another shock to the system. Ireland's current sense of gloom permeates the Irish air and patterns of current behaviour.

The Irish working class 'nigger' status is not just fact abroad but it is still a reality on their own Island. It is crystal clear for centuries in the north of the island, with their sectarian treatment by the Orange Order culture, as crystallized in exchanges in the last few days, between the racist Gregory Campbell and Gerry Adams, it also true in the south, where the "West Brit Elite" still control society. Allied to a native gombeen class of neo-fascists in Fine Gael, along with colluding Labour careerists. The mafianomics of the corporate bankers and their sponsored native politicians, are denuding Ireland of it's native resources and people, with a ruthlessness, comparable to deforestation. Their instruction manual is the "Gerry Adams," as they adopt a scorched earth policy, leaving an rish wasteland that is soulless. 


Ireland   National Debt of Ireland

Ireland Debt Clock

204,643,296,961 

Source: Irish Government Data

The Figures

Interest per year:
9,787,870,202€

Population:
4,591,087

GDP:
179,692,529,688€

Interest per second:
310€

Citizen's Share:
44,574€

Debt as % of GDP:
113.89%

Interesting Facts

  • You could wrap $1 bills around the Earth 990 times with the debt amount!
  • If you lay $1 bills on top of each other they would make a pile 27,767 km, or 17,253 miles high!
  • That's equivalent to 0.07 trips to the Moon!

Household Share

Household Share:  44,574












Pope urges a “lonely” “self-absorbed” Europe to recover its soul


2014-11-26 Vatican Radio

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis called on a “haggard” and “lonely” Europe to recover its role as a world protagonist, its identity as a defender of the transcendent dignity of man, the poor, the migrant, the persecuted, the old and the young, to recover its soul: Christianity.
Emer McCarthy reports: 
In a lengthy address– the first of two on his one day visit to the heart of Europe –  he told members of the European Parliament in Strasbourg that a two-thousand-year-old history links Europe and Christianity, “not free of conflicts or errors, but driven by the desire to work for the good of all”. This “is our present and our future.  It is our identity”, he said
The Pope also urged Europe’s 500 million citizens to see the Union’s problems – economic stagnation, unemployment, immigration, rising poverty levels and a growing polarization -  as a “force for unity” to overcome fears and mutual mistrust.
“Dignity” he said was the pivotal concept in the process of rebuilding which followed the Second World War and led to the European project. Today it remains central to the commitment of the European Union. But Pope Francis warned, often the concept of human rights is misunderstood and misused. 
He pointed to tendency to uphold the rights of the individual, “without regard for the fact that each human being is part of a social context wherein his or her rights and duties are bound up with those of others and with the common good of society itself”.         
Transcendent human dignity – the Pope continued - means regarding human beings not as absolutes, but as beings in relation.  He spoke of a Europe rampant with the disease of loneliness a direct result of the trend towards individualism. He said the economic crisis has worsened this pervasive loneliness and nourished a growing mistrust in people towards institutions considered aloof and bureaucratic. 
The Pope spoke of the unsustainable opulence of selfish lifestyles amid indifference to the poorest of the poor, where technical and economic questions dominate political debate, to the detriment of genuine concern for human beings.
This – the Pope noted –reduces human life to being a “cog in a machine” which, if no longer useful, can be “discarded with few qualms, as in the case of the terminally ill, the elderly who are abandoned and uncared for, and children who are killed in the womb”. This – Pope Francis said quoting Benedict XVI - is the great mistake made “when technology is allowed to take over”; the result is a confusion between ends and means”.
The future of Europe – added Pope Francis - depends on the recovery of the vital connection between openness to God and the practical and concrete ability to confront situations and problems.
The Pope said Christianity is not a threat to secular Europe but rather an enrichment. He said religions can help Europe counter “many forms of extremism” spreading today that are often “a result of the great vacuum of ideals which we are currently witnessing in the West”.
Here he decried the “shameful and complicit silence” of many while religious minorities are being “evicted from their homes and native lands, sold as slaves, killed, beheaded, crucified or burned alive”.
Pope Francis went on to observe that the motto of the European Union isUnited in Diversity, but unity, does not mean uniformity. Keeping democracy alive in Europe means avoiding the many globalizing tendencies to dilute reality.
Keeping democracies alive is a challenge in the present historic moment, he continued, but  it must not be allowed to collapse under the pressure of multinational interests which are not universal. It means nurturing the gifts of each man and woman; investing in families, the fundamental cell and most precious element of any society; in educational institutes;  in young people today who are asking for a suitable and complete education to help them to look to the future with hope instead of disenchantment. 
In areas such as the ecology Europe has always been in the vanguard, the Pope said, while noting that today “millions of people around the world are dying of hunger while tons of food are discarded each day from our tables”. 
He also spoke of the need to promote policies that create employment, but above all “restore dignity to labour by ensuring proper working conditions” while avoiding the exploitation of workers and ensuring “their ability to create a family and educate their children”.
On the issue of migration Pope Francis called for a united response decrying the lack of a coordinated EU wide effort to adopt policies that assist migrants in their countries of origin and that promote a just and realistic integration: “We cannot allow the Mediterranean to become a vast cemetery!” he decried to lengthy applause.
Pope Francis concluded: “The time has come for us to abandon the idea of a Europe which is fearful and self-absorbed, in order to revive and encourage a Europe of leadership, a repository of science, art, music, human values and faith as well.  A Europe which contemplates the heavens and pursues lofty ideals.  A Europe which cares for, defends and protects man, every man and woman.  A Europe which bestrides the earth surely and securely, a precious point of reference for all humanity!

WILD FLOWERS Not your Garden Variety

Patricia Black

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Born

28 November 1972

Belfast,


Died

15 November 1991 (aged 18)

London, England


Allegiance

Provisional Irish Republican Army


Years of service

1972 - 1991


Rank

Volunteer


Unit

Belfast Brigade



Patricia Black, also known as Pat Black or Patricia Black-Donnelly(28 November 1972 – 15 November 1991) was a Volunteer in theBelfast Brigade of the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA).

1 Background
2 Active service
3 See also
4 References



Patricia Black grew up in the Lenadoon area of Belfast and was educated at St. Oliver Plunkett Primary School and St. Genevieve's Girls Secondary School in Belfast.[1][2]
Active service


Patricia joined the IRA at the age of 17. Her comrades considered her a determined and dedicated young woman and she was tasked with the role of intelligence gathering. Later Black informed her parent that she was moving to Dublin but secretly moved to London.[1][3]


She died, along with fellow Volunteer, Frank Ryan, on 15 November 1991, when an improvised explosive device she was carrying detonated prematurely near London. A British Armymilitary band had been playing in theatre on St Peter's Street in St Albans which the pair had planned to attack, when the device unexpectedly exploded killing her and Ryan.[4]


At the funeral of Frank Ryan a Sinn Féin leader, Jim Gibney, stated "Frankie and Patricia are not alone. They are representatives of a generation of Ireland's youth who have acquired the skills to remain hidden, who come forward when required to do so. How will the British defeat this invisible force?"


Black is buried in Milltown Cemetery Belfast.[1]


The Volunteers Patricia Black and Frankie Ryan Memorial Flute Band from the Garngad area of Glasgow is jointly named after her, they are politically aligned to éirígí. [5]


A political mural depicting a uniformed armed female republican in uniform in the Lenadoon area of Belfast is jointly dedicated to Black as well as Laura Crawford, Bridie Quinn andMairéad Farrell.[6]


A memorial to Black and Ryan was erected in their honour at the Sally Gardens Centre in Belfast. At its unveiling in 2007, West Belfast MLA Jennifer McCann stated "They are our heroes and our inspiration. They are no longer with us but let us take their vision forward."


Maud Gonne WikiLink

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

GERRY ADAMS COMES OUT AS GREGORY GETS HIS GOAT UP




MICHELLE SMYTH – 25 NOVEMBER 2014 

Sinn Fein president Gerry Adams has ignited another war of words after describing unionists as b******s last night at a public meeting.

 Mr Adams spoke about “bigotry” in unionism and said: “The point is to break these b******s... break them with equality.”

He also claimed that unionists were “scundered” by people like DUP MP Gregory Campbell. He was asked by a member of the audience about Sinn Fein’s relationship with the DUP in light of recent events, including the controversial comments made by Mr Campbell about the party’s use of the Irish language.

Mr Adams, who is now a TD for Louth, replied that when he returns to visit Belfast some nationalists and republicans would ask him to explain the point of working with the DUP.

He added: "There are people who don't want the nonsense that Gregory Campbell spouts... the bigotry."

Mr Adams said: "But what's the point? The point is to actually break these b******s - that's the point. And what's going to break them is equality. That's what's going to break them - equality. Who could be afraid of equality? Who could be afraid of treating somebody the way you want to be treated. That's what we need to keep the focus on - that's the Trojan horse of the entire republican strategy."

Mr Adams made his comments in Enniskillen, a venue that angered unionists further because of its history of the Remembrance Day IRA bombing.

The remarks came after Gregory Campbell infuriated republicans with remarks he made at a party conference at the weekend.

Mr Campbell also remarked that the DUP will be treating Sinn Fein's "wish list" like toilet paper.

Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness described those remarks as "absolutely appalling".

Mr Campbell said last night he was not surprised when the Belfast Telegraph informed him of what Mr Adams had said.

"The Sinn Fein mask has definitely slipped," he said.

"People will now be able to see their true colours. To those who know and understand Gerry Adams' background this may not come as a surprise.

"Sinn Fein has for a long time done a sterling job at keeping their true feelings under wraps but now people will be able to see them completely clearly for what they are. All of this is in response to a humorous anecdote."


Enterprise Minister and Fermanagh and South Tyrone MLA Arlene Foster said: "Respect is a two-way street. The hyperbole from republicans over recent days has been exposed as hypocrisy.

"Republicans use the Irish language as a weapon and tonight Gerry Adams confirms that they view equality as another weapon to attack unionists, or "these b******s" as he would term us.

"Will Sinn Fein now unleash a tirade of outrage against their party president or will they once again stand behind him as they have over his denial of IRA membership, his involvement in Jean McConville's murder or the cover-up of sexual abuse.

"On Saturday John O'Dowd told us that if any Sinn Fein member was disrespectful to someone's culture they would be expelled by Martin McGuinness.

"Gerry Adams has been disrespectful to an entire community. We await details of the disciplinary hearing."

Ulster Unionist leader, Mike Nesbitt MLA said Mr Adams' remarks are "stunning in their arrogance and hatred. On a day I began by criticising the DUP's Gregory Campbell for his gratuitous insult to those who cherish the Irish language, I despair that I have to end it by challenging Gerry Adams to clarify why he believes equality is no more than a trick to lure unionists into some sort of trap".

Mr Adams was joined at the meeting by Michelle Gildernew MP and Pearse Doherty.

UUP Fermanagh and south Tyrone MLA Tom Elliot said: "It is almost beyond belief that the president of a political party would use this type of language. It says a lot about his character and about Sinn Fein. It is insulting wherever remarks like this are made but even more so that this was said in Enniskillen where the poppy day bombing took place and where many people have suffered."
ADRIAN RUTHERFORD – 24 NOVEMBER 2014


The DUP's Gregory Campbell has said he will not be 'dictated to or deflected by terrorists' after receiving a death threat following comments he made about the Irish language.

It comes after the DUP MP reiterated comments about the Irish language during his party's annual conference at the weekend.

Mr Campbell sparked fury last month when he mocked Irish during a Stormont debate.

He said: "Curry my yoghurt can coca coalyer" - an apparent reference to the Irish phrase "go raibh maith agat, Ceann Comhairle" - thank you, Mr Speaker.

Police have now warned him of a threat to his life.

Responding, he said he would "not I will not be apologising for, or deviating from doing the right thing".

"This is not the first time that my life has been put under threat by republicans, and the challenge now is whether those who supported the threats in the past will condemn those who do it now. If they do, it is an indication that we have indeed moved on," he said.

"I will not be dictated to or deflected by terrorists. I took the opportunity today at Question Time, to reiterate my determination. Exposing those politicising the Irish language, as well as those making unrealistic political demands at the talks table is the right thing to do. How dare anyone try to suggest that it is something to be ashamed of."

A PSNI spokesman said: "We do not comment on specific threats however if we receive information that an individual may need to review their security we will take steps to inform them immediately."

East Londonderry MP Gregory Campbell jokingly referred to the jibe during a speech at the party conference on Saturday.

He told delegates it was always good to start the day with a healthy breakfast, before producing a tub of yoghurt and saying: "So I got some yoghurt today.

"And I'm looking forward to lunch, because they tell me there's some curry there."

Irish language leader Micheal O Duibh - who addressed the DUP conference - said he was dismayed by a fresh attack on the language from one of the party's MPs.

He said it felt like "one step forward, two steps back" after Gregory Campbell's remarks.


Mr Campbell also said the DUP would treat Sinn Fein's "entire wish list" - which includes calls for an Irish Language Act - like toilet paper. His latest comments have been condemned by Mr O Duibh, who took part in a panel discussion on the first day of the conference.

Mr O Duibh, who is chief executive of Comhairle na Gaelscolaiochta, the body responsible for the promotion of Irish-medium schooling, said his remarks were disrespectful.

"It is very disappointing," he told the Belfast Telegraph.

"When I was speaking at the party conference I was bringing a very positive message and I very much welcomed the invitation.

"It was a first for Irish-medium education and, most likely, a first for anybody from the Irish language background to be invited to a DUP conference.

"I gave a very warm céad míle fáilte to everybody and brought across a very strong, positive message that the Irish language and Irish-medium education is there for any parent who chooses it for their child, regardless of their social, cultural, religious or indeed linguistic background.

"To bring that positive message to the conference, and then the next day to hear the comments from Gregory Campbell felt very much like one step forward and two steps back."

Mr O Duibh said he felt let down by the latest remarks.

"In one way it was positive that I was invited to the conference," he added. "In another way it gives me an understanding of how Gregory feels or what his position is on the language.

"When you hear the party leader talk about a shared future, I wonder how he, as leader, can talk about that shared future when his party colleague feels it is okay to comment on the language in this way."

Mr Campbell appears to have made his yoghurt joke off the cuff, since it was not included in the embargoed copy of his speech released by the party press office on Saturday morning. Afterwards, DUP leader Peter Robinson defended the remarks as comedy.

However, Sinn Fein minister John O'Dowd condemned Mr Campbell and Mr Robinson.

"The insult directed by Gregory Campbell at the Irish language community from the DUP conference is appalling," the Education Minister said. "He was clearly sticking two fingers up to the Irish language community and to authority of the assembly which sanctioned him for his unacceptable behaviour in the chamber.

"I'm dismayed that Peter Robinson, in echoes of his failure to deal promptly with abuse directed at the Muslim community earlier this year, has added insult to injury by suggesting Campbell's mockery was a piece of comedy."



What they said

Micheal O Duibh: "I gave a very warm céad míle fáilte to everybody and brought across a very strong, positive message that the Irish language and Irish medium education is there for any parent who chooses it for their child.

"To bring that positive message to the conference, and then the next day to hear the comments from Gregory Campbell felt very much like one step forward and two steps back."

Peter Robinson: "This is getting tedious. If all that you have out of the whole of the party conference is to question me about that, then there are better things I could be doing.

"Lighten up will you? It's a party conference and it was a bit of comedy in the middle of it, let's get on with some real business."

Dominic Bradley, SDLP: "Mr Campbell may think that he is targeting Sinn Fein with these slurs but the Irish language community is much wider and deeper than the membership of any one political party.

"Irish language speakers, those who aspire to speak Irish and all right-minded people who respect the languages of others will be insulted and disappointed by Gregory Campbell's antics."

John O'Dowd, SF: "The insult directed by Gregory Campbell at the Irish language community from the DUP conference is appalling.

"He was clearly sticking two fingers up to the Irish language community."



Background

Dr Micheal O Duibh is the chief executive of Comhairle na Gaelscolaiochta, the body responsible for the promotion of Irish-medium schooling. He was invited to take part in a panel discussion on the future of education on the first day of the DUP conference.

The organisation described it as "a significant and historical occasion".

GREGORY AN GABHAIR



ADRIAN RUTHERFORD – 24 NOVEMBER 2014


The DUP's Gregory Campbell has said he will not be 'dictated to or deflected by terrorists' after receiving a death threat following comments he made about the Irish language.

It comes after the DUP MP reiterated comments about the Irish language during his party's annual conference at the weekend.

Mr Campbell sparked fury last month when he mocked Irish during a Stormont debate.

He said: "Curry my yoghurt can coca coalyer" - an apparent reference to the Irish phrase "go raibh maith agat, Ceann Comhairle" - thank you, Mr Speaker.

Police have now warned him of a threat to his life.

Responding, he said he would "not I will not be apologising for, or deviating from doing the right thing".

"This is not the first time that my life has been put under threat by republicans, and the challenge now is whether those who supported the threats in the past will condemn those who do it now. If they do, it is an indication that we have indeed moved on," he said.

"I will not be dictated to or deflected by terrorists. I took the opportunity today at Question Time, to reiterate my determination. Exposing those politicising the Irish language, as well as those making unrealistic political demands at the talks table is the right thing to do. How dare anyone try to suggest that it is something to be ashamed of."

A PSNI spokesman said: "We do not comment on specific threats however if we receive information that an individual may need to review their security we will take steps to inform them immediately."

East Londonderry MP Gregory Campbell jokingly referred to the jibe during a speech at the party conference on Saturday.

He told delegates it was always good to start the day with a healthy breakfast, before producing a tub of yoghurt and saying: "So I got some yoghurt today.

"And I'm looking forward to lunch, because they tell me there's some curry there."

Irish language leader Micheal O Duibh - who addressed the DUP conference - said he was dismayed by a fresh attack on the language from one of the party's MPs.

He said it felt like "one step forward, two steps back" after Gregory Campbell's remarks.


Mr Campbell also said the DUP would treat Sinn Fein's "entire wish list" - which includes calls for an Irish Language Act - like toilet paper. His latest comments have been condemned by Mr O Duibh, who took part in a panel discussion on the first day of the conference.

Mr O Duibh, who is chief executive of Comhairle na Gaelscolaiochta, the body responsible for the promotion of Irish-medium schooling, said his remarks were disrespectful.

"It is very disappointing," he told the Belfast Telegraph.

"When I was speaking at the party conference I was bringing a very positive message and I very much welcomed the invitation.

"It was a first for Irish-medium education and, most likely, a first for anybody from the Irish language background to be invited to a DUP conference.

"I gave a very warm céad míle fáilte to everybody and brought across a very strong, positive message that the Irish language and Irish-medium education is there for any parent who chooses it for their child, regardless of their social, cultural, religious or indeed linguistic background.

"To bring that positive message to the conference, and then the next day to hear the comments from Gregory Campbell felt very much like one step forward and two steps back."

Mr O Duibh said he felt let down by the latest remarks.

"In one way it was positive that I was invited to the conference," he added. "In another way it gives me an understanding of how Gregory feels or what his position is on the language.

"When you hear the party leader talk about a shared future, I wonder how he, as leader, can talk about that shared future when his party colleague feels it is okay to comment on the language in this way."

Mr Campbell appears to have made his yoghurt joke off the cuff, since it was not included in the embargoed copy of his speech released by the party press office on Saturday morning. Afterwards, DUP leader Peter Robinson defended the remarks as comedy.

However, Sinn Fein minister John O'Dowd condemned Mr Campbell and Mr Robinson.

"The insult directed by Gregory Campbell at the Irish language community from the DUP conference is appalling," the Education Minister said. "He was clearly sticking two fingers up to the Irish language community and to authority of the assembly which sanctioned him for his unacceptable behaviour in the chamber.

"I'm dismayed that Peter Robinson, in echoes of his failure to deal promptly with abuse directed at the Muslim community earlier this year, has added insult to injury by suggesting Campbell's mockery was a piece of comedy."



What they said

Micheal O Duibh: "I gave a very warm céad míle fáilte to everybody and brought across a very strong, positive message that the Irish language and Irish medium education is there for any parent who chooses it for their child.

"To bring that positive message to the conference, and then the next day to hear the comments from Gregory Campbell felt very much like one step forward and two steps back."

Peter Robinson: "This is getting tedious. If all that you have out of the whole of the party conference is to question me about that, then there are better things I could be doing.

"Lighten up will you? It's a party conference and it was a bit of comedy in the middle of it, let's get on with some real business."

Dominic Bradley, SDLP: "Mr Campbell may think that he is targeting Sinn Fein with these slurs but the Irish language community is much wider and deeper than the membership of any one political party.

"Irish language speakers, those who aspire to speak Irish and all right-minded people who respect the languages of others will be insulted and disappointed by Gregory Campbell's antics."

John O'Dowd, SF: "The insult directed by Gregory Campbell at the Irish language community from the DUP conference is appalling.

"He was clearly sticking two fingers up to the Irish language community."



Background

Dr Micheal O Duibh is the chief executive of Comhairle na Gaelscolaiochta, the body responsible for the promotion of Irish-medium schooling. He was invited to take part in a panel discussion on the future of education on the first day of the DUP conference.

The organisation described it as "a significant and historical occasion".



THE WHITE GOAT

I

By

SEUMAS O'KELLY

The white goat stood in a little clearing closed in by a ring of whins on the hillside. Her head swayed from side to side like the slow motion of the pendulum of a great clock. The legs were a little spread, the knees bent, the sides slack, the snout grey and dry, the udder limp.
The Herd knew the white goat was in great agony. She had refused the share of bran he had brought her, had turned away from the armful of fresh ivy leaves his little daughter held out to her. He had desisted from the milking, she had moaned so continuously.
Some days before the Herd had found the animal injured on the hill; the previous night he had heard the labourers making a noise, shouting and singing, as they crossed from the tillage fields. He knew what had happened when he had seen the marks of their hob-nailed boots on her body. She was always a sensitive brute, of a breed that came from the lowlands. The sombre eyes of the Herd glowed in a smouldering passion as he stood helplessly by while the white goat swung her head from side to side.
He gathered some dry bracken and spread a bed of it near the white goat. It would be unkind to allow her to lie on the wet grass when the time came that she could no longer stand. He looked up at the sky and marked the direction of the wind. It had gone round to the west. Clouds were beginning to move across the sky. There was a vivid light behind the mountains. The air was still. It would rain in the night. He had thought for the white goat standing there in the darkness, swaying her head in agony, the bracken growing sodden at her feet, the rain beating into her eyes. It was a cold place and wind-swept. Whenever the white goat had broken her tether she had flown from it to the lowlands. He remembered how, while leading her across a field once, she had drawn back in some terror when they had come to a pool of water.
The Herd looked at his little daughter. The child had drawn some distance away, the ivy leaves fallen from her bare arms. He was conscious that some fear had made her eyes round and bright. What was it that the child feared? He guessed, and marvelled that a child should understand the strange thing that was about to happen up there on the hill. The knowledge of Death was shining instinctively in the child's eyes. She was part of the stillness and greyness that was creeping over the hillside.
"We will take the white goat to the shelter of the stable," the Herd said.
The child nodded, the fear still lingering in her eyes. He untied the tether and laid his hand on the horn of the goat. She answered to the touch, walking patiently but unsteadily beside him.
After a while the child followed, taking the other horn, gently, like her father, for she had all his understanding of and nearness to the dumb animals of the fields. They came slowly and silently. The light failed rapidly as they came down the hill. Everything was merged in a shadowy vagueness, the colour of the white goat between the two dim figures alone proclaiming itself. A kid bleated somewhere in the distance. It was the cry of a young thing for its suckle, and the Herd saw that for a moment the white goat raised her head, the instinct of her nature moving her. Then she tottered down the hill in the darkness.
When they reached the front of the stable the white goat backed painfully from the place. The Herd was puzzled for a moment. Then he saw the little pool of water in a faint glimmer before their feet. He brought the animal to one side, avoiding it, and she followed the pressure of his directing hand.
He took down a lantern that swung from the rafters of the stable and lighted it. In a corner he made a bed of fresh straw. The animal leaned over a little against the wall, and they knew she was grateful for the shelter and the support. Then the head began to sway in a weary rhythm from side to side as if the pain drove it on. Her breath quickened, broke into little pants. He noted the thin vapour that steamed from about her body. The Herd laid his hand on her snout. It was dry and red hot. He turned away leading the child by the hand, the lantern swinging from the other, throwing long yellow streaks of light about the gloom of the stable. He closed the door softly behind him.

II

It was late that night when the Herd got back from his rounds of the pastures. His boots soaked in the wet ground and the clothes clung to his limbs, for the rain had come down heavily. A rumble of thunder sounded over the hills as he raised the latch of his door. He felt glad he had not left the white goat tethered in the whins on the hill.
His little daughter had gone to sleep. His wife told him the child on being put to bed had wept bitterly, but refused to confess the cause of her grief. The Herd said nothing, but he knew the child had wept for the white goat. The thought of the child's emotion moved him, and he turned out of the house again, standing in the darkness and the rain. Why had they attacked the poor brute? He asked the question over and over again, but only the rain beat in his face and around him was darkness, mystery. Then he heard the voices higher up on the side of the hill, first a laugh, then some shouts and cries. A thick voice raised the refrain of a song, and it came booming through the murky atmosphere. The Herd could hear the words:
Where are the legs with which you run?
Hurroo! Hurroo!
Where are the legs with which you run?
Hurroo! Hurroo!
Where are the legs with which you run
When first you went to carry a gun?
Indeed, your dancing days are done!
Och, Johnny, I hardly knew ye!
And then came the chorus like a roar down the hills:
With drums and guns, and, guns and drum
The enemy nearly slew ye;
My darling dear, you look so queer,
Och, Johnny, I hardly knew ye!
The voices of the labourers passing from the tillage fields died away, and the rumble of thunder came down more frequently from the hills. The Herd crossed his garden, his boots sinking in the soft ground. Half way across he paused, for a loud cry had dominated the fury of the breaking storm. His ears were quick for the cries of animals in distress. He went on rapidly toward the stable.
The ground grew more sloppy and a thin stream of water came from the rim of his soft black hat, streaming down his face. He noted the flashes of lightning overhead. Through it all the cry of the white goat sounded, with that weird, vibrating "mag-gag" that was the traditional note of her race. It had a powerful appeal for the Herd. It stirred a feeling of passion within him as he hurried through the rain.
How they must have lacerated her, a poor brute chained to the sod, at the mercy of their abuse! The red row of marks along her gams, raw and terrible, sprang to his sight out of the darkness. Vengeance, vengeance! He gripped his powerful hands, opening and closing the fists. Then he was conscious of something in the storm and the darkness that robbed him of his craving for personal vengeance. All that belonged to the primitive man welled up in him. He knew that in the heart of the future there lurked a reckoning—something, somebody—that would count the tally at the appointed time. Then he had turned round the gable of the stable. He saw the ghostly white thing, shadowy in the blackness, lying prostrate before the door. He stood still, his breath drawn inward.
There was a movement in the white shape. He could discern the blurred outline of the head of the animal as she raised it up a little. There was a low moan followed by a great cry. The Herd stood still, terror in his heart. For he interpreted that cry in all the terrible inarticulate consciousness of his own being. That cry sounded in his ears like an appeal to all the generations of wronged dumb things that had ever come under the lash of the tyranny of men. It was the protest of the brute creation against humanity, and to the Herd it was a judgment. Then his eyes caught a murky gleam beside the fallen white shape, and the physical sense of things jumped back to his mind.
He remembered that in wet weather a pool of water always gathered before the stable door. He remembered that there was a glimmer of it there when he had led the white goat into the stable. He remembered how she had shown fear of it.
He stooped down over the white goat where she lay. Thin wisps of her hair floated about looking like dim wraiths against the blackness of the pool. He caught a look of the brown eyes and was aware that the udder and teats bulged up from the water. He sank down beside her, the water making a splash as his knees dropped into the place. The animal raised her head a little and with pain, for the horns seemed to weigh like lead. But it was an acknowledgment that she was conscious of his presence; then the head fell back, a gurgle sounding over one of the ears.
The Herd knew what had happened, and it was all very tragical to his mind. His wife had come out to the stable for something, and had left the door open behind her. The white goat, goaded by the growing pain, had staggered out the door, perhaps feeling some desire for the open fields in her agony. Then she had seen before the threshold of the door that which had always been a horror to her—a pool of water. The Herd could see her tottering and swaying and then falling into it with a cry, fulfilling her destiny. He wondered if he himself had the same instinct for the things that would prove fatal to him? Why was he always so nervous when he stooped to or lay upon the ground? Why did it always give him a feeling that he would be trampled under the hooves of stampeding cattle rounded up for treatment for the warble fly? He trembled as he heard the beat of hooves on the ground behind him. He peered about and for a while did not recognise the shape that moved restlessly about in the darkness. He heard the neigh of the brood mare. He knew then she had been hovering about the stable afraid to go in out of the storm. She was afraid to go in because of the thing that lay before the stable door. He heard the answering call of the young foal in the stable, and he knew that it, too, was afraid to come out even at the call of its dam. Death was about in that night of storm, and all things seemed conscious of it.
He stooped down over the white goat and worked his hands under her shoulders. He lifted her up and felt the strain all over his frame, the muscles springing tense on his arms. She was a dead weight, and he had always prided on her size. His knees dug into the puddle in the bottom of the pool as he felt the pressure on his haunches. He strained hard as he got one of his feet under him. With a quick effort he got the other foot into position and rose slowly, lifting the white form out of the pool. The shaggy hair hung from the white goat, limp and reeking, numerous thin streams of water making a little ripple as they fell. The limbs of the Herd quivered under the weight, he staggered back, his heavy boots grinding in the gravel; then he set his teeth, the limbs steadied themselves, he swayed uncertainly for a moment, then staggered across the stable door, conscious of the hammer strokes of the heart of the white goat beating against his own heart. He laid her down in the bed of straw and heard the young foal bounding out of the stable in terror. The Herd stood in the place, the sweat breaking out on his forehead, then dropping in great beads.
The white goat began to moan. The Herd was aware from the rustling of the straw that her limbs were working convulsively. He knew from the nature of her wounds that her death would be prolonged, her agonies extreme. What if he put her out of pain? It would be all over in a moment. His hand went to his pocket, feeling it on the outside. He made out the shape of the knife, but hesitated.
One of the hooves of the white goat struck him on the ankle as her limbs worked convulsively. His hand went into his pocket and closed around the weapon. He would need to be quick and sure, to have a steady hand, to make a swift movement. He allowed himself some moments to decide. Then the blade of the knife shot back with a snap.
The sound seemed to reach the white goat in all its grim significance. She struggled to her feet, moaning more loudly. The Herd began to breathe hard. He was afraid she would cry out even as she had cried out as she lay in the pool before the stable door. The terror of the things that made up that cry broke in upon the Herd. He shook with fear of it. Then he stooped swiftly, his fingers nervously feeling over the delicate course of the throat of the white goat. His hands moved a little backwards and forwards in the darkness. He felt the hot stream on his hands, then the animal fell without a sound, her horns striking against the wall. He stood over her for a moment and was conscious that his hands were wet. Then he remembered with a shudder that the whole tragedy of the night had been one of rains and pools and water and clinging damp things, of puddles and sweats and blood. Even now the knife he held in his fingers was dripping. He let it fall. It fell with a queer thud, sounding of flesh, of a dead body. It had fallen on the dead body of the white goat. He turned with a groan and made his way uncertainly for the stable door.
At the door he stood, thoughts crowding in upon him, questions beating upon his brain and giving no time for answer. Around him was darkness, mystery, Death. What right had he to thrust his hand blindly into the heart of this mystery? Who had given him the power to hasten the end, to summon Death before its time? Had not Nature her own way for counting out the hours and the minutes? Had not she, or some other power, appointed an hour for the white goat to die? She would live, even in agony, until they could bear her up no longer; and having died Nature would pass her through whatever channel her laws had ordained. Had not the white goat made her last protest against his interference when she had risen to her feet in her death agony? And if the white goat, dumb beast that she was, had suffered wrong at the hands of man, then there was, the Herd now knew, a Power deliberate and inexorable, scrupulous in its delicate adjustment of right and wrong, that would balance the account at the appointed audit.
He had an inarticulate understanding of these things as he moved from the stable door. He tripped over a barrow unseen in the darkness and fell forward on his face into the field. As he lay there he heard the thudding of hooves on the ground. He rose, dizzy and unnerved, to see the dim shapes of some cattle that had gathered down about the place from the upland. He felt the rain beating upon his face, the clothes hung dank and clammy to his limbs. His boots soaked and slopped when he stepped. A boom of thunder sounded overhead and a vivid flash of lightning lit up for an instant a great elm tree. He saw all its branches shining with water, drops glistening along a thousand stray twigs. Then the voices of the labourers returning over the hills broke in upon his ears. He heard their shouts, the snatches of their songs, their noise, all the ribaldry of men merry in their drink.
The Herd groped through the darkness for his house like a half-blind man, his arms out before him, and a sudden gust of wind that swept the hillside shrieked about the blood of the white goat that was still wet upon his hands.

Monday, November 24, 2014

BLUESHIRTS IN GLASSHOUSES SHOULD NOT THROW STONES







Anyone who reads this Irish Blog regularly, would be aware that I have perhaps been Gerry Adams fiercest critic, and that I was raging on the child abuse issue in Ireland and within the Provisionals, long before it went mainstream. My motivation was the enormity of this particular crime and the enabling denial within Irish society for so long about this issue. What heaped further rage on the matter for me, is that this horrendous crime is still used by the British, to manipulate Irish society, through blackmail at every level of society both North and South on the Island. This for me is the ultimate crime against humanity, and all human rights activists need to consider it, as one of their primary, targets, with campaigns for transparency. It is also proof if anymore were needed, of the malign nature and effect of British interference in Ireland.

The Irish writer Oscar Wilde, wrote, "The truth is rarely pure and never simple." From personal experience of  Irish politics, I would have to reluctantly agree. What is currently, particularly galling for me, is to witness establishment political parties of Fine Gael, Labour and Fianna Fail, along with their colleagues in the British secret services, using the most vulnerable part of our society, i.e. sexually abused children, as a stick to beat the emerging challenge of an alternative party, slightly more to the left and perhaps more independent of British influence, particularly, with the possibilities of large numbers of independents, being returned at the nest election. All of these three parties, were the principal participants in the 'SYSTEMIC' sexual abuse of Irish children, since the foundation of the 'Irish Free State' as the highly expensive, official inquires reported. They were fully aware of the extent of it and had the power to end it, of that, there can be no doubt. That is the now the transparent record of Fianna Fail, Fine Gael and Labour in power in the corrupt, illusionary 'Free State of Ireland'.

When it comes to Gerry Adams and Provisional Sinn Fein, we are moving into Oscar Wilde territory, that is not simply my opinion, that is my own experience. When I worked voluntarily in the Provisional's Centre in Newry, while a very intense war by the British, was raging in the background, a few reports came to my desk there, of senior IRA persons in Dundalk being involved in child abuse. I can categorically state, that I did everything humanly possible to deal with it, other than take the 'law' into my own hands and eliminate the person personally without sufficient proof, that the reports were authentic. I also firmly believe, that every person is entitled to a jury of 12 of their peers, for any serious crime, which is not the case in British Occupied Ireland. Anything less than 12 jurors, permits all sorts of contrived abuse, in my humble opinion. This simply is still not possible in that part of Ireland, because there is still a low intensity war being fought there.

As someone who has lambasted Gerry Adams and his colleagues for years, I have to admit there are some positive aspects to Adams personally. Yes, it was the correct time to end the long war for numerous reasons, too complex to deal with here. However I disagree vehemently, with the secret contrived manner of how that was made to happen. Adams has tried to engage in proactive politics, rather than the abyss of reactionary politics, i.e. allow the British and their puppets continually set the agenda, while Irish republicans and the Left, are left to simply flounder in reactionary activity. I will give him credit for that but to return to the subject at hand, I believe people like Adams, would not be alive today, if he confronted the monster of child abuse within the Provisionals thoroughly. 

During the course of the long war, a regular feature of life for any Irish Republican, was to be taken regularly to interrogation centres like Gough Barracks or Castlereagh and be interrogated for up to a week, which now has been extended to 28 days. As a result of this activity, over the course of the years of the long war, they were able to infiltrate and manipulate their agents into the most senior positions, within the organization and engineer consent, to some British policies in Ireland and I believe they continue with this, in subsequent secret societies. That for me, was a justifiable reason to change direction and stop wasting precious life.

Interrogation in Gough Barracks was also a regular feature of my own life in Newry. One of the first things that became obvious to me, was that their primary focus, was profiling, e.g. was I dove or a hawk? Over time, it became clear, that they were well versed on most of the activity on the ground in Newry. All serious operations carried out there, were conducted from elsewhere. In my case they were more interested in profiling me and trying to cultivate a working relationship, which never happened. They seemed desperate for information about the rural area of South Armagh, which had  stronger family and community bonds, that they appeared unable to break. I wish I could say the same about the more urban, deprived area of Newry, which produced some of the finest volunteers, who were forced to operate from elsewhere. Family ties and loyalty, are a critical part of this matter but it also carries it's negatives, as in the case of child abuse, which the British exploit to the maximum.

In the period leading up to the Irish Holocaust and since, in deprived areas of desperate poverty with large Catholic families, there was often, more than 20 persons sleeping in a single small room, whether it be tenements of Dublin, rural hovels of poverty in the countryside or in the gerrymandered neighbourhoods of the sectarian north, where inevitably all sorts of deviancy evolved. The victims often commit suicide, engage in self-destructive behaviour, such as alcoholism or drug addiction in modern Ireland. Those who survive it, often identify British Imperialism and their Irish gombeen agents, as the source of their rage. I personally grew up in a very violent home, where I blamed my blueshirt father to the point of hatred, as the source of that violence but as I grew older I realized it was bit more complex than that. Ultimately though I blamed British Imperialism. As I have traveled around the World, I can see it is far from confined to the British. When I caught myself over-chastising two of my sons, while I had a hangover, I realized from own childhood experience, that the best thing I could do for my children, was walk away. This is by no means for any human being, an easy choice.

Anyway to get back to Gerry Adams and Provisional Sinn Fein, there are many careerist there, that I have no time for them at all but there are some, for whom I would have a grudging respect. To cut a long story short, I firmly believe that Adams, no more than any other member of his party, with the exception of Martin McGuinness and a few of his cronies, had the power to stop child abuse within the ranks of the IRA. I am convinced that had they tried to do so, they would have been eliminated, ruthlessly, immediately by both the British and their gombeen agents, such as the fascist blueshirts in Ireland.They know who they are, enlightened Irish people know who they are and unless there is a proper transparent, truth and reconciliation process set up in Ireland, there is a day of reckoning coming on the island with a fury, that will make Rwanda look like a twelfth of July bonfire. Personally, I will reluctantly give Adams, because of family, community and war extenuating circumstance, along with a few of his colleagues, the benefit of the doubt on this one.

Mairia Cahill, featured in the article below from the Irish Times, obviously has the same courage as her grandfather, in her backbone, to speak out about all of this. So have all of the the other victims, both female and male, who have spoken out, but from raging all of my life at my own father and his many images in Ireland, the jury is still out with me, on numerous Irish women who were aware of the endemic child rape but for various reasons, have mostly stayed silent or indeed attacked, people like Sinead O'Connor who has protested about it. I'm also aware that I am writing this from a male perspective, albeit with a strong feminine side. Only an Irish mother with strong maternal instincts, can write about this. I'm still waiting and I believe women, particularly in Irish public life, have a responsibility to do so. I was told a long time ago in the Netherlands, who themselves also have a huge problem with this, that we are as sick as our secrets. Secrecy seems to be an endemic part of contemporary Irish culture. I was also told that the truth will make me free and to a large extent it has. I am writing this on a tropical island thousands of miles away from Ireland, whether I could safely write it and stay alive in Ireland is rather doubtful. There are thousands of men and women like me, walking around Ireland, who will take their dark secrets to their graves, many of them prematurely, unless elected representatives of the people, have the courage to take responsibility and do the right thing, as opposed to their own thing. 

As I have repeated often in this blog, I am not a religious person but this dark chapter of Irish life has consumed my soul for most of my life. One person has witnessed me rant and rave about it for more than 20 years, paradoxically he is an Englishman, whom I first told when I met him, that I should shoot. His political beliefs are quite different to mine but I can say, he is my best friend.  I am glad this very long dark chapter of Irish life, has at long last seen the light of day in Ireland, but I still rage, that it is still exploited by the political parties of the Irish and British establishment, for personal and party gain. This is nothing short of criminal, bearing in mind, that they and their parties have never been brought to account by the Irish media or its injustice system, for their critical, enabling part in this most horrendous of crimes. There will be no one happier, when this meets closure but there can be no shortcuts, only the truth can make us all free. It no longer keeps me personally, away from the Sunlight of the Spirit, except on the odd bad day. It was enabled by people who understood and who stayed with me patiently through it, only because, they understood it from their own experience. I also learned that it is better to keep counsel, than speak with someone who does not understand or have a similar experience. This can be critical for those who are suicidal. I can safely say, that I have made far more mistakes in my lifetime, than the average person, and the only reason I am still around, is the quality of mercy I have been shown.

Last month, someone, whom I knew quite well from Newry and for whom I would probably have taken a bullet, was interned for political reasons and by the course of the abnormal injustice system there, may well spend the rest of his life interned. I would not take a bullet for him today, not because of anything he has done since but simply because I value life in general, including my own, far more now. Sadly, that is selfish but without it, I would not be alive to write this. I value what I write, principally because some of  these facts, are something that any young potential volunteer needs to consider, very carefully, before they commit. Like a carpenter, you can measure often but you only commit once. That is not say, that my dreams for Ireland have changed, but I believe they can be achieved intelligently, with persistence and remembering again what Mairead Farrell said. "that our head is our best weapon", with the minimum of violence. 

Merchant of Venice - Shakespeare

The quality of mercy is not strained; It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest; It blesseth him that gives and him that takes: ‘T is mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown: His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway; It is enthronèd in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God’s When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much To mitigate the justice of thy plea; Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice Must needs give sentence ‘gainst the merchant there.




Up to 30 names of alleged IRA sex offenders have now been given to gardaí, Ms Cahill claims


A file photo of Maíria Cahill arriving at the Dáil earlier this month for a debate on allegations of sexual abuse by members of the republican movement. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

Tim O'Brien



Sun, Nov 23, 2014, 16:21


First published:Sun, Nov 23, 2014, 15:15


Maíria Cahill has said more than 30 names of alleged IRA sex offenders have now been given to gardaí.

Ms Cahill, who claims the IRA covered up and failed to report her alleged rape and sexual assault by a leading republican, said over the last five weeks many more people had contacted her with relevant information about alleged sexual abuse by members of the IRA.

In relation to the number of alleged abusers who details have been given to police, Ms Cahill said: “This week I spent quite a number of hours with the gardaí passing on information which I had received, for the second time in a month.

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“We are looking at probably around four times the number of names now, that Regina Doherty said in the Dáil, that she had passed on eight names to the gardaí”.

Ms Cahill said she had been contacted by other victims immediately after the BBC spotlight programme broadcast her allegations. She said it was “horrendous” people had been only confident enough to contact her on social media such as Twitterand Facebook, “but also very good that those victims did come forward” and she had “signposted them on” to both the PSNI and the gardaí and agencies could help them.

She said these were people who had similar experiences to her own “through IRA internal investigations into their sexual abuse”.

She also said some people who were not victims had come forward with information in relation to the alleged abusers.

Asked on RTE’s Saturday Night Show if she believed the abuse was “endemic”, Ms Cahill replied a lot of new information had come out about alleged IRA abuse in the last five weeks.

She compared this to the allegations of clerical sex abuse in theCatholic Church, where it “was ten years before the full extent was realised.”

Speaking about her experience Ms Cahill said the abuse and the difficulty in being brought before the IRA inquiry affected her entrance to university.

“Something had to give. Unfortunately for me the thing that gave was university. She said she began taking sleeping pills and when one woman who had been part of the IRA inquiry apologised to her for what had happened, it had been “beyond traumatic”.

She said being an abuse victim was like being somebody’s rag doll and the IRA investigation was a similar lack of control.

Ms Cahill said she went into psychiatric care for week, and was released but ultimately attempted an overdose in 2007, which she said was “rock bottom” and had to do something particularly because she was “haunted” that other children might be at risk.

“I didn’t want other people to have to go through that”. She said she didn’t regret for a second speaking out about what had happened.