Sunday, 30 November 2014

WE ARE UNITED IRELAND AGAINST FASCIST BLUESHIRTS



If history repeats itself and the unexpected always happens,how incapable must Man be of learning from experience.Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time, wrote George Bernard Shaw, 26 July 1856 to November 1950, who was an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics. Successful students of history, know the veracity of Shaw's statement,hopefully the Irish people and future leaders of Ireland, will bears this in mind over the immediate future. Below are two articles, which I believe are relevant, to what is currently happening in Ireland.Please pass it on for their attention.



In his book Surviving the Economic Collapse Fernando ‘Ferfal’ Aguirre says that because most people are used to peace and stability they often realize too late that they are in danger. Rather than taking up defensive positions when pushed or confronted by strangers people tend to default to traditional social guidelines so as not to appear inconsiderate or overly reactionary. “This is based on a natural tendency to please others,” says Aguirre.

But making this mistake could have serious adverse implications for you and your family, because acting just a split-second late could lead to serious injury or even death, an outcome Ferfal witnessed all too often during the disorderly collapse of Argentina in the early 2000′s.

“You have to re-program yourself to react violently when surprised or threatened in any way,” recommends Aguirre, who notes that it is necessary to modify your psychological and unconscious social behavior in environments where the potential for violence is high. Rather than expecting non-confrontation, a prepared individual should expect exactly the opposite.


The following video, taken on the Atlantic City Boardwalk shows how very quickly a simple disagreement can turn violent.

An unknown individual is seen arguing with a street vendor and pushing his street booth against the man in what can only be described as an act of thuggery. The vendor is seen trying to back away from the man, but the thug would have none of it.

As the vendor backs up, the thug keeps moving towards him, cutting off any escape route. Words turn to fists and the thug lunges forward with a pretty powerful punch.

The vendor, having anticipated the violent action, immediately moves off of the assailants attack line and out-of-the-way.

After that it’s lights out.

As you watch the video pay close attention to the street vendor’s right hand. While he attempted all methods of avoiding confrontation – stepping backwards from the fight, walking away, and even putting his hands up in a universal non-confrontational manner – it is clear that he went into the situation with the assumption that this individual might take it further than just a screaming match. As such, he concealed what seems to be some sort of metallic weapon in his right hand.

After the thug lunges towards the vendor, the subsequent counter-attack is swift and devastating.

The thug literally never knew what hit him.




Blueshirts

From Wikipedia, 

Eoin O'Duffy becomes leader

In January 1933, the Fianna Fáil government called a surprise election, which the government won comfortably. The election campaign saw a serious escalation of rioting between IRA and ACA supporters. In April 1933, the ACA began wearing the distinctive blue shirt uniform. Eoin O'Duffy was a guerrillaleader in the IRA during the Irish War of Independence, a National Army general during the Civil War, and the policecommissioner in the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1933. After de Valera's re-election in February 1933, Valera dismissed O'Duffy as commissioner, and in July of that year, O'Duffy was offered and accepted leadership of the ACA and renamed it the National Guard. He re-modelled the organisation, adopting elements of European fascism, such as the Roman straight-arm salute, uniforms and huge rallies. Membership of the new organisation became limited to people who were Irish or whose parents "profess the Christian faith". O'Duffy was an admirer ofBenito Mussolini, and the Blueshirts adopted corporatism as their chief political aim. According to the constitution he adopted, the organisation was to have the following objectives:[7]
  • To promote the reunification of Ireland.
  • To oppose Communism and alien control and influence in national affairs and to uphold Christian principles in every sphere of public activity.
  • To promote and maintain social order.
  • To make organised and disciplined voluntary public service a permanent and accepted feature of our political life and to lead the youth of Ireland in a movement of constructive national action.
  • To promote of co-ordinated national organisations of employers and employed, which with the aid of judicial tribunals, will effectively prevent strikes and lock-outs and harmoniously compose industrial influences.
  • To cooperate with the official agencies of the state for the solution of such pressing social problems as the provision of useful and economic public employment for those whom private enterprise cannot absorb.
  • To secure the creation of a representative national statutory organisation of farmers, with rights and status sufficient to secure the safeguarding of agricultural interests, in all revisions of agricultural and political policy.
  • To expose and prevent corruption and victimisation in national and local administration.
  • To awaken throughout the country a spirit of combination, discipline, zeal and patriotic realism which will put the state in a position to serve the people efficiently in the economic and social spheres.
Because of the later attraction of the group's leader Eoin O'Duffy to authoritarian nationalist movements on the European Continent, the Blueshirts are sometimes compared to the MVSN (Blackshirts) of Italy and to some extent performed a similar function.[8][9] Some of the Blueshirts later went to fight for Francisco Franco during the Spanish Civil War and wereanti-communist in nature, however historian R.M. Douglas has stated that it is dubious to portray them as an "Irish manifestation of fascism".

March on Dublin

The National Guard planned to hold a parade in Dublin in August 1933. It was to proceed to Glasnevin Cemetery, stopping briefly on Leinster lawn in front of the Irish parliament, where speeches were to be held. The goal of the parade was to commemorate past leaders of Ireland, Arthur GriffithMichael Collins and Kevin O'Higgins. It is clear that the IRA and other fringe groups representing various socialists intended to confront the Blueshirts if they did march in Dublin. The government banned the parade, remembering Mussolini's March on Rome, and fearing a coup d'état. Decades later, de Valera told Fianna Fáil politicians that in late summer 1933, he was unsure whether the Irish Army would obey his orders to suppress the perceived threat, or whether the soldiers would support the Blueshirts (who included many ex-soldiers). O'Duffy accepted the ban and insisted that he was committed to upholding the law. Instead, several provincial parades took place to commemorate the deaths of Griffith, O'Higgins and Collins. De Valera saw this move as defying his ban, and the Blueshirts were declared an illegal organisation.

Fine Gael and the National Corporate Party

In response to the banning of the National Guard, Cumann na nGaedheal and the National Centre Party merged to form a new party, Fine Gael, on 3 September 1933. O'Duffy became its first president, with W. T. Cosgrave and James Dillon acting as vice-presidents. The National Guard changed into the Young Ireland Association, and became part of a youth wing of the party. The party's aim was to create a corporatist United Ireland within the British Commonwealth. The 1934 local elections were a trial of strength for the new Fine Gael and the Fianna Fáil government. When Fine Gael won only 6 out of 23 local elections, O’Duffy lost much of his authority and prestige.[10] The Blueshirts began to disintegrate by mid-1934.[11] The Blueshirts floundered also on the plight of farmers during the Economic War, as the Blueshirts failed to provide a solution. Following disagreements with his Fine Gael colleagues, O'Duffy left the party, although most of the Blueshirts stayed in Fine Gael. In December 1934, O'Duffy attended the Montreux Fascist conference in Switzerland. He then founded the National Corporate Party, and later raised an"Irish Brigade" that took General Francisco Franco's side in theSpanish Civil War.[12]
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